NewsNotes

February 2013

 

 

 

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More than an end to war, we want an end to the beginning of all wars — yes, an end to this brutal, inhuman and thoroughly impractical method of settling the differences between governments.

~Franklin D. Roosevelt

 

 

 

Table of Contents

EPS News

In Other News

Links

Funding & Employment Opportunities

EPS Publications

Action Corner

Upcoming Events

How Can I Help?

 

 

EPS News

 

Call for Papers : 17th Annual International Conference on Economics and Security, Stockholm, June 14 & 15, 2013 

 

SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute) is pleased to announce the 17th Annual International Conference on Economics and Security. The conference is co-organized by SIPRI and Economists for Peace and Security. The conference program will include research papers selected based on the call for proposals, with  a mix of plenary sessions and parallel workshop streams on particular research areas. Some of these sessions will seek to bring together SIPRI researchers and conference participants on issues related to SIPRI’s areas of research. 

 

If you would like to present a paper, please send a title and an abstract of less than 300 words before April 1, 2013.

 

Further information about the call for papers can be found here:

http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/ICES2013/call_for_papersold.

 

Papers should be sent to Sam Perlo-Freeman at

perlo-freeman@sipri.org.

 

 

 

Minimum Returns: The Economic Impacts of Pentagon Spending

By William D. Hartung and Natalie Peterson for The Center for International Policy, February 7, 2013

 

"Over the past two years, Pentagon contractors have financed a series of studies that have made exaggerated claims about the economic impacts of reductions in Pentagon spending.  This report refutes a number of the key findings of those industry-backed reports, which have been extensively promoted in an effort to influence politicians and the media in Washington and around the country.  Specifically, this analysis looks at the impacts of Pentagon contracting for weapons, supplies and services."


The full report is available in both HTML and PDF versions here:

http://www.ciponline.org/research/entry/minimum-returns-the-economic-impacts-of-

pentagon-spending.

 

 

 

EPS at the ASSA/AEA Annual Meetings
San Diego, CA

 

Video of our Annual Dinner and audio of our sessions is now available.

 

Economists for Peace and Security hosted two sessions, and a dinner in honor of Michael Intriligator, at the ASSA/AEA Annual meetings in San Diego.

 

Session I:

"Up from Here? Challenges and Barriers to Recovery from the Crisis"

Panel Moderator: James Galbraith (University of Texas-Austin)
Kenneth Arrow (Stanford University)
Robert Gordon (Northwestern University)
Eric Laursen (Independent Journalist)
Yanis Varoufakis (University of Athens)

 

Session II:

"Is War Over? The Economics of National Security after Iraq and Afghanistan"
Panel Moderator: Michael Lind (New America Foundation)
Linda Bilmes (Harvard University)
Richard Kaufman (Bethesda Research Institute)
J. Paul Dunne (University of Cape Town)

 

For more information about EPS at The ASSA/AEA and to watch the video, see

http://www.epsusa.org/events/aea.htm.

 

 

 

EPS raised $65 last year with GoodSearch. The more you use GoodSearch, the more money you can raise for EPS, just by searching the internet or shopping online — at no cost to you. Every time you search the web, EPS receives a penny; when everyone uses it, the pennies add up.

 

To start using GoodSearch, go to 

http://www.goodsearch.com/about.aspx.

 

 

 

Look for EPS on Facebook. Become a fan and keep up with our latest activities and upcoming events.

 

Become a fan of EPS at

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Economists-for-Peace-and-Security/114370951337.

 

 

 

EPS has a group page on LinkedIn. If this is your preferred social network, check in with us.

 

Keep up with EPS at
www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=2009987&trk=anetsrch_name&goback=.gdr_1263369639671_1.

 

 

 

In Other News

 

The Force
 

How much military is enough?

By Jill Lepore, January 28, 2013, for The New Yorker

 

"Sixty-two legislators sit on the House Armed Services Committee, the largest committee in Congress. Since January 2011, when Republicans took control of the House, the committee has been chaired by Howard P. McKeon, who goes by "Buck." He has never served in the military, but this month he begins his third decade representing California’s Twenty-fifth Congressional District, the home of a naval weapons station, an Army fort, an Air Force base, and, for the Marines, a place to train for mountain warfare. McKeon believes that it’s his job to protect the Pentagon from budget cuts. On New Year’s Day, after a thirteenth-hour deal was sealed with spit in the Senate, McKeon issued a press statement lamenting that the compromise had failed to 'shield a wartime military from further reductions.'

 

"The debate about taxes is over, which is one of the few good things that can be said for it. The debate about spending, which has already proved narrow and grubby, is pending."

 

The entire article can be read here:

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2013/01/28/130128crat_atlarge_lepore#ixzz2IkFnYD9H.

 

 

 

Pentagon resists budget cuts - without even knowing how much it spends

GOP hawks who defend the US military's budget from Chuck Hagel's charge of "bloated" must account for why it isn't audited

By Michael Shank for The Guardian, January 23, 2013

 

"No matter how much Congress softens the sequestration's austerity footprint, everyone in government will have to nip-and-tuck in order to balance budgets. And that will include the Pentagon — something that Secretary of Defense nominee Chuck Hagel and even the Bowles-Simpson commission support.

 

"We cannot afford to continue a clear and present double standard in Washington DC while also keeping the government accountable to its taxpayers. On one side of the discretionary spending spectrum, Republicans are absolutely religious about each government dollar doled out, and are quite keen to see sequestration cuts — to 'entitlement' programs. On the other side, cuts to defense spending and oversight of the Pentagon is not up for discussion.

 

"In fact, Republicans, joined by some conservative Democrats, are now going further. They will fight to ensure that no defense cuts whatsoever be included in any deal to forestall the automatic sequestration."

 

The full article is available at

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/23/pentagon-budget-cuts-chuck-hagel.

 

 

 

Call for Papers: The Inclusive Growth in Africa - Conference

 

UNU-WIDER invites interested participants to submit original research related to the two conference themes below. They are open to contributions that use rigorous research methods from economics, and other social sciences, and welcome papers that hold important implications for policy.

 

Measuring growth, poverty, and inequality

The study of well-being, in terms of concepts, theoretical principles and measurements, has been at the core of research in the field of development economics over the last three decades. More recently, special attention has been paid to the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of poverty and inequality. This theme focuses on innovative methods, theories and empirical approaches to measuring poverty, inequality and social and economic mobility from national, regional, or continent-wide perspectives. An important area is the use of macro, sectoral, price, qualitative, and other data as a crosscheck on traditional poverty survey data. Papers that assess the reliability of basic growth, poverty or inequality data are also welcome, as are papers on other developing regions that offer lessons and insights relevant to the African context.

 

Causes and consequences of inclusive growth

Inclusive growth requires broad participation in the development process. While Africa recently has enjoyed fairly rapid economic growth, it is debatable whether this has led to the kind of transformation needed to create decent jobs and improve well-being over the long term. This theme focuses on the underlying drivers of growth in Africa and their implications for social and economic inclusion. At the same time, the theme addresses whether and how inclusive growth can contribute to broader economic, social, and political transformation. Important issues include, for example, gender, youth, the middle class, and the private sector in Africa’s development process over the last decade. Papers that consider the (in)effectiveness of specific policies in promoting social inclusion are especially welcome.

 

For more information about this call for papers, see

http://www1.wider.unu.edu/inclusivegrowth/article/about-inclusive-growth-africa-conference.

 

 

 

Call for papers: Conflict Research Society 1963-2013 Anniversary Conference

 

The CRS is an interdisciplinary forum linking professionals and academics concerned with co-operation and conflict and provides a meeting point for sharing their work. The conference embraces theory, evidence and practice,inviting presentation and discussion. It seeks to bring together developments in the "real" world and developments in academic understanding — topical issues and enduring issues. Moreover, it recognizes the existence of disagreement: concepts, theories and approaches can be contested.

 

The 2013 conference carries forward the work of the annual conferences running since 2003. Tuesday and Wednesday constitute the "core" of the conference and follow the pattern of previous years (Streams A to D). Thursday, repeating last year’s innovation, is for those who have a special interest in the scientific study of peace and conflict.

 

Details on this call for papers are at

www.crs2012.net/register.php.

 

To learn more about the CRS, go to

http://www.conflictresearchsociety.org.uk/.

 

 

 

Links


 

Off the balance sheet: the impact of the economic crisis on girls and young women

A new report by Plan and ODI, January 2013, Authors: Maria Stavropoulou and Nicola Jones

 

This report by Plan and The Overseas Development Institute (ODI) examines the continuing and deepening impact of the economic crisis on girls and young women worldwide. Founded 75 years ago, Plan is one of the oldest and largest children's development organisations in the world. ODI is the UK's leading independent think tank on international development and humanitarian issues.

 

Long-standing economic trends, entrenched gender inequality, and austerity budgets have all left girls and their families bearing the brunt of fewer resources and reduced access to services.

 

Key findings from this joint report include:

  • Girls drop out of school more, with a 29% decrease in primary school completion for girls versus 22% for boys.
  • Family poverty hits girls hardest: a 1% fall in GDP increases infant mortality by 7.4 deaths per 1,000 births for girls versus 1.5 for boys.
  • Health cuts leave adolescent girls at greater risk during pregnancy, with 14—19 year olds most at risk of death in pregnancy in many countries.


Read the full report here:

http://plan-international.org/about-plan/resources/publications/economic-security/off-the-balance-sheet-the-impact-of-the-economic-crisis-on-girls-and-young-women/.

 

 

 

Transfers of small arms and light weapons to fragile states: strengthening oversight and control
Mark Bromley, Lawrence Dermody, Hugh Griffiths, Paul Holtom and Michael Jenks
SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security

 

"The need for security forces in a fragile state to be adequately trained and equipped is recognized as a precondition for stability and development. However, supplying arms to security forces in fragile states can contribute to armed conflict and instability.

 

"The risks associated with supplying arms and ammunition to fragile states include the risk that the arms will be diverted to actors seeking to undermine stabilization efforts; the risk that the arms will contribute to the renewal or intensification of armed conflict; and the risk of corruption in the transaction.

 

"A number of European Union, NATO and OECD states have undertaken risk mitigation measures, sometimes in cooperation with recipients as part of security sector reform (SSR) programs. These measures include supporting multilateral notification systems for arms transfers; increasing control and oversight of the delivery of arms and ammunition; ensuring good standards for stockpile management, marking on import and surplus destruction; and improving the recipient states’ standards in arms procurement.

 

"The challenge for the international community is to ensure that fragile states receive the arms that they require, while limiting the negative impacts on conflict dynamics, stabilization efforts and governance."

 

 

To read the paper, go to

http://books.sipri.org/product_info?c_product_id=453.

 

 

 

Funding & Employment Opportunities 

 

Master of Arts in Conflict Analysis and Reconciliation
Sarajevo School of Science and Technology

Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

 

The Political Science and International Relations Department of SSST University has launched a new Master’s Program in Conflict Analysis and Reconciliation (CAR). The program will offer students a unique and highly interdisciplinary approach to understanding and analyzing intergroup conflicts.

 

Students will be taught by highly respected Bosnian and international scholars who will provide them with a comprehensive and experiential understanding of the processes and conditions leading to various types of intergroup conflicts (ethnic, religious, communal, political etc.) and of conflict resolution techniques, as well as post-conflict related processes such as power sharing, justice and reconciliation. The issues will be analyzed and discussed from a multi-disciplinary perspective ranging from political philosophy, political science and international law to social psychology. Studying conflict in a post-conflict setting such as Sarajevo will provide students with a first-hand perspective and direct understanding of challenges and issues, while discussing and integrating theory, research and practical approaches.

 

More information about the master's program is available here: 

http://www.ssst.edu.ba/news-and-events/news/a-new-master-s-programme-at-ssst/251.

 

 

 

Robert S. McNamara Fellowships Program

Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame, Indiana

 

The Robert S. McNamara Fellowships Program provides support to young researchers working in academic and research institutions from eligible countries preparing a doctoral thesis. Research grants cover residence costs for a 5 to 10 month period in a renowned university or research center. Fellows are expected to advance their research work mainly by using the facilities and resources provided by the host institution and by interacting with peers.

 

Candidate's field of research should be related to development at the master's level, in fields such as economics, health, education, agriculture, environment, natural resource management, or other development‑related subject

 

Additional information about this program is available at

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/WBI/EXTWBISFP/EXTRSMFP

/0,,contentMDK:21588578~menuPK:552352~pagePK:64168445~piPK:

64168309~theSitePK:551843,00.html.

 

 

 

EPS Publications 

 

EPS Quarterly, December 2012 — The Fiscal Cliff Issue

 

This issue contains summaries of the proceedings from The EPS/Bernard Schwartz Symposium Who's Afraid of the Fiscal Cliff?  held at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, Washington DC on November 13, 2012. The Symposium was organized by Economists for Peace and Security and co-sponsored by The New America Foundation.
 

Table of contents

  • Session One: On the Cliff
  • Session Two: On the Military Sequester
  • Session Three: Essential Priorities –
    Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and Infrastructure

Read this issue of EPS Quarterly at

http://www.epsusa.org/publications/newsletter/2012/dec2012/dec2012.pdf.

 

 

 

EPS Quarterly, September 2012 — The Inequality Issue

 

The issue of inequality was key in the 2012 US presidential race. Should we be taxing the very rich more, or giving them tax breaks? Whom should we tax and how much, in order to create jobs — the point of job creation being (presumably) to lower inequality? 
 

Table of contents

  • America's prosperity requires a level playing field
    Joseph Stiglitz
  • The Complex Ties among Poverty, Development, and Security
    Terra Lawson-Remer
  • Group Inequality and Conflict: Some Insights for Peacebuilding
    Michelle Swearingen
  • Inequality: A few comments from the front lines
    James K. Galbraith
  • With Income Inequality Comes Violence
    US News Staff

Read this issue of EPS Quarterly at

http://epsusa.org/publications/newsletter/2012/sept2012/sept2012.pdf.

 

 

 

The Economics of Peace and Security Journal, Vol. 7, No. 2  On Afghanistan, Rwanda, Punjab - July, 2012

 

Contents:

Does development assistance reduce violence? Evidence from Afghanistan 

CHOU, Tiffany

Intimate partner violence, female employment, and male backlash in Rwanda

FINNOFF, Kade

Designing institutions for global security

GUPTA, Rupayan

Insurgency, crime, and agricultural labor expenditure: Evidence from Punjab, 1978-1990

SINGH, Prakarsh

Analyzing the costs of military engagement

DE GROOT, Olaf J.

 

The Journal is a peer-reviewed online publication hosted by EPS-UK. Published twice yearly, it raises and debates all issues related to the political economy of personal, communal, national, international, and global peace and security. Previous contributors include Joseph Stiglitz, James Galbraith, and Lawrence Klein. The Journal’s website also features book reviews submitted by members and subscribers.

EPS members receive a 25% discount on the annual subscription to the Economics of Peace and Security Journal. A regular one-year subscription is $32; for EPS members, it's only $24! Non-subscribers can access the abstracts and contents pages.

 

The issues for Vol. 8 (2013) will be for April and October.

For more information about the Journal or to subscribe:
http://www.epsjournal.org.uk/.


To become a member of EPS (and qualify for the subscription discount):

http://epsusa.org/membership/membership.htm.

 

Learn more about this issue of the Journal by visiting

http://www.epsjournal.org.uk/Vol7/No2/issue.php.

 

 

 

 Action Corner

 

Catastrophic Pentagon Cuts? Not Really  

 

The Friends Committee on National Legistaion (FCNL) has a convenient page to help you send emails or letters to your reps in Congress. There's a link to a video you can view for more information.

 

"Members of Congress, both Democrats and Republicans, are backing away from making significant cuts to the Pentagon budget. Senate Democrats are now saying they want to see cuts of only $27 billion, and House Republicans are pursuing a plan to restore all planned Pentagon budget cuts.

 

"The Pentagon and some members of Congress claim that cutting $1 trillion over 10 years is too drastic.

 

"Even after these cuts, the conclusion of two wars, and accounting for inflation, we'd still be spending more on the Pentagon than we did during most of Vietnam and the Cold War. And we'd still be spending many, many times as much on the Pentagon as we spend on other critical priorities like education, stopping climate change, and engaging diplomatically with the rest of the world.

 

"Yet Congress can't even agree to let these cuts happen."

 

To write your members of Congress, go to

http://www.capwiz.com/fconl/issues/alert/?alertid=62412456&type=CO.

 

 

 

Get the word out on the topics that matter most to you!

 

When freedom is under attack in Congress and state legislatures, an engaged populace is its first line of defense. Take action on current issues and let lawmakers know that you want them to protect your civil liberties. The ACLU website offers a list of key issues and actions you can take to make your voice heard. It also offers a tool with which to check your elected officials' voting record, and the ACLU Congressional Scorecard. 

 

Check out the ACLU list of topics, your representatives' votes, and the Congressional Scorecard here:
http://www.aclu.org/action-center.

 

 

 

Do you have a foreign policy alternative that should be heard in the halls of government?

 

Citizens for Global Solutions Political Action Committee (Global Solutions PAC) works to elect federal candidates who support building effective democratic global institutions that will apply the rule of law while respecting the diversity and autonomy of national and local communities.

 

To learn more about Global Solutions PAC, visit

http://globalsolutions.org/.

 

To access the email or ground mail addresses of your representatives in Congress or the Senate, enter your zip code at

http://congress.org/congressorg/directory/congdir.tt.

 

 

 

If you would like to post an EPS flyer on a departmental bulletin board or similar venue, please contact Thea Harvey at theaharvey@epsusa.org.

 

 

 

Upcoming Events 

 

  • March 20 — 22, 2013 The 1st West Africa Microfinance Conference — Accra, Ghana.

    The African Center for Peace Building (ACFOPB) will host the first WAM Conference under the theme "empowering Africa for economic peace: the role of the microfinance sector."

    The WAM Conference seeks to address the challenges confronting the microfinance sector in the sub-region. The Conference aims to equip the participants from the West Africa sub-region with the skills needed in managing microfinance business, and to provide a common platform for sharing ideas, resources and network.

    Find out more about the conference at
    http://wamic.afcopb.org/invitation/?goback=.gde_2009987_member_193108690.
  • March 21 — March 23 The International Conference on Global Diaspora will be held at Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

    For more information contact Manas Chatterji
    mchatter@binghamton.edu.
  • April 17 — 19, 2013 22nd Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference: Building a Financial Structure for a More Stable and Equitable Economy will be held at the Ford Foundation, New York, New York.

    It’s time to put global finance back in its proper place as a tool to achieving sustainable development. This means substantial downsizing, careful reregulation, universal social protections, and an active, permanent employment-creation program. Therefore, the 2013 Minsky Conference will address both financial reform and poverty in the context of Minsky’s work on financial instability and his proposal for a public job guarantee.

    Find out more by visiting
    http://www.levyinstitute.org/news/?event=45.
  • May 24 — 25, 2013 The Eurasian Peace Science Conference will be held at Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey, hosted by the Center for Conflict Studies.

    For more information about the conference, see
    http://conflictstudiescenter.ku.edu.tr/upcoming_conference.html.
  • June 13  15, 2013 The 17th Annual International Conference on Economics and Security will be held at SIPRI, Stockholm, Sweden.

    The conference program will include research papers selected based on the call for proposals, with a mix of plenary sessions and parallel workshop streams on particular research areas. Some of these sessions will seek to bring together SIPRI researchers and conference participants on issues related to SIPRI’s areas of research.

Further details about the conference call for papers can be found at
http://www.sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/ICES2013/call_for_papers.

  • June 15 — July 13, 2013 The 2013 Bologna Symposium on Conflict Prevention, Resolution, and Reconciliation will be hosted by the International Peace & Security Institute in Bologna Italy.

    In cooperation with The Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), the 2013 Bologna Symposium will bring together the globe’s brightest minds from top graduate institutions, NGOs, international organizations, grassroots peace movements, and the armed services. Participants undergo intensive training by the field’s premier political leaders, academic experts, practitioners, and advocates in the practical skills necessary to foster peace and security in their communities and the world.

    To learn more about the symposium, go to
    http://ipsinstitute.org/bologna-2013/?PHPSESSID=c49b22cc9dfd21f61d40e9c8090ff67c.
  • June 19 — 21, 2013 The Fifth International Conference on Conflict Management, Peace Economics and Peace Science will be held at Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    For more information, contact Manas Chatterji at
    mchatter@binghamton.edu.
  • June 24  26, 2013 The 13th Jan Tinbergen European Peace Science Conference will be held in Milan, Italy.

    The Jan Tinbergen Conference is interdisciplinary. Presentations that address any issue relating to peace and security broadly defined are welcome. As in the past, the conference strives for a multi-disciplinary program comprising contributions with a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches, including strictly theoretical work, game theory and formal modeling, statistical and econometric analysis, qualitative studies, and experiments.

    Find out more about the conference when you visit
    http://www.europeanpeacescientists.org/jan.html.
  • July 20 — August 17, 2013 The 2013 Hague Symposium on Post-Conflict Transitions & International Justice will be hosted by the International Peace & Security Institute in The Hague, The Netherlands.

    Participants will undergo intensive training from 25 of the field’s premier political leaders, academic experts, practitioners, and advocates in the skills necessary to holistically restructure a post-conflict society, as well as serve justice to those responsible for human rights violations. Participants will gain a broad understanding of concepts, controversies, and institutions in this emerging field, as well as critically examine historical and contemporary justice interventions through direct interactions with the actual decision makers.

    For more information, see
    http://ipsinstitute.org/the-hague-2013/.
  • September 17 — 18, 2013 The Peace and Conflict: an international interdisciplinary conference hosted by The Conflict Research Society at the University of Essex, UK.

The CRS is an interdisciplinary forum linking professionals and academics concerned with co-operation and conflict and provides a meeting point for sharing their work. The conference embraces theory, evidence and practice,inviting presentation and discussion. It seeks to bring together developments in the "real" world and developments in academic understanding — topical issues and enduring issues. Moreover, it recognizes the existence of disagreement: concepts, theories and approaches can be contested.

The 2013 conference carries forward the work of the annual conferences running since 2003. Tuesday and Wednesday constitute the "core" of the conference and follow the pattern of previous years (Streams A to D). Thursday, repeating last year’s innovation, is for those who have a special interest in the scientific study of peace and conflict.


For details about the conference, email
crs2013essex@gmail.com.

 

 

 

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